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Thread: Fwiw

  1. #1

    Fwiw

    For the season, Duane is averaging 27.7 mpg, 11.8 ppg, and he's shooting 40% from the field, 31% on treys, and 76% from the line.

    Nine years ago, as a frosh, Jerel averaged 27.5 mpg, 11.1 ppg, and shot 44% from the field, 28% on treys, and 75% from the line.

    Food for thought.

  2. #2
    Duane Wilson also does not throw the ball away almost 30% of the time when he uses a possession. Love the player that Jerel McNeal became, but I will contend that he played 10-15 minutes a night too many as a freshman out of necessity (and was fortunately surrounded by an excellent point guard and a number of good shooters). Think Duane Wilson also has a much better feel for the game at comparable points of their career.

    Edit: In fairness, Jerel was a much better defender at this point of their careers, though it seemed like Jerel's defense regressed at the same rate his offense improved in college.
    #FreeMattThomas

  3. #3
    If memory serves, Jerel had more turnovers than any other player in the Big East as a freshman, but an inordinate number of those were offensive fouls. I think he had at least one offensive foul call almost every game.

    Jerel, however, was also an outstanding rebounder for a guard, especially a 6'2" guard. He averaged 4.5 rpg as a frosh.

    I think he also led the Big East in steals. At the very least he was second with 2.1 spg.

    Duane is quicker than Jerel was especially on offense, and he has better hops. But Jerel was physically stronger.

    But the biggest difference, I think, may have been Jerel's - for lack of a better term - "Chicago toughness." He played with an edge. We've had some physically tough back courts over the years, but the combination of DJ and Jerel may have been the toughest.

    By the way, another similarity: Jerel was ranked #57 on the final RSCI for the Class of '05; Duane was ranked #59 in the Class of '13.

    Jerel ended up first-team all-Big East (and second-team A-A) as a senior. I can definitely envision Duane ending up a first-team all-Big East player as well.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Mark Miller's Avatar
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    Good stuff Phantom.

  5. #5
    Man...9 years ago...sobering

  6. #6
    McNeal was a horrible defender on ball defender. He had his share of steals because he gambled, but he couldn't keep a player in front of him. Great example of stats not telling the whole story.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by GOMU1104 View Post
    Man...9 years ago...sobering
    makes a certain "young" MU fan feel old

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MU88 View Post
    McNeal was a horrible defender on ball defender. He had his share of steals because he gambled, but he couldn't keep a player in front of him. Great example of stats not telling the whole story.

    That didn't stop him from becoming BE defensive POY if I remember correctly.

  9. #9
    MU88,

    Jerel was a solid on-ball defender as a freshman, but his on-ball defense went downhill after that. I could never figure out why. He was very good off the ball at jumping the passing lane.

    He also had quite a few blocks for a guard, and his defensive rebounding was superb for a guard.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Phantom Warrior View Post
    If memory serves, Jerel had more turnovers than any other player in the Big East as a freshman, but an inordinate number of those were offensive fouls. I think he had at least one offensive foul call almost every game.

    Jerel, however, was also an outstanding rebounder for a guard, especially a 6'2" guard. He averaged 4.5 rpg as a frosh.

    I think he also led the Big East in steals. At the very least he was second with 2.1 spg.

    Duane is quicker than Jerel was especially on offense, and he has better hops. But Jerel was physically stronger.

    But the biggest difference, I think, may have been Jerel's - for lack of a better term - "Chicago toughness." He played with an edge. We've had some physically tough back courts over the years, but the combination of DJ and Jerel may have been the toughest.

    By the way, another similarity: Jerel was ranked #57 on the final RSCI for the Class of '05; Duane was ranked #59 in the Class of '13.

    Jerel ended up first-team all-Big East (and second-team A-A) as a senior. I can definitely envision Duane ending up a first-team all-Big East player as well.

    I think he sealed up 10 of the offensive fouls in that one Cincinnati game alone, just kept driving at them and either got it swatted or was called for charging.

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